Vincent Who?

Saturday, Oct 4th, 2008 - 7:00 PM

Venue: United States Navy Memorial

Advance (Online)PriceDoor SalesPrice
General$8General$10
Senior 65+/ Students$7Senior 65+/ Students$8
Group (min 6 tickets)$7

Community Sponsor: Asian Pacific American Bar Association of the Greater Washington, DC Area

Community Sponsor: Conference on Asian Pacific American Leadership

Community Event Sponsors: Asian American Justice Center (AAJC), National Council of Asian Pacific Americans

**Filmmakers in attendance

Snapshot: Six Months Of The Korean American Male

Directed by Valerie Soe

Running Time: 5 minutes
Year: 2008
Documentary
Language(s): English

Website:

Using footage, headlines, and quotes from the mass media, this experimental video explores the images and representations of four Korean American men (John Cho, Yul Kwon, James Kim, Seung-hui Cho) that were featured prominently in the news over the course of six months in 2007.

The Pain with Being Thirsty

Directed by David Yun

Running Time: 7 minutes
Year: 2007
Documentary
Language(s): English

Website:

A letter written by a Muslim prisoner in Guantanamo Bay combined with footage of life in Japanese internment camps raises questions about the perceptions of our enemies and notions of American identity in times of war.

Vincent Who?

Directed by Tony Lam

Running Time: 40 minutes
Year: 2008
Documentary
Language(s): English

Website: http://www.vincentchin.net

In 1982, during a night out celebrating, Chinese American Vincent Chin was brutally murdered in Detroit by white autoworkers who mistakenly thought he was Japanese.  This singular tragedy is often cited as the beginning of the Asian American civil rights movement, due to the uproar that ensued following a judge’s lenient sentencing of Chin’s attackers.  Now 26 years after the event, how many people actually remember Chin’s murder, the hatred that led up to it, and its long, painful aftermath?

Lam’s probing documentary Vincent Who? explores these and other questions.  It seeks to bring the history of this critical event and the struggles that followed to a new generation of Asian Americans too young to know or remember Vincent Chin.  Through archival footage and interviews with key players in the movement such as Stewart Kwoh, Rene Tajima-Pena, Frank Wu, Lisa Ling and Helen Zia, Lam powerfully retells a watershed event in Asian American history and the legacy it left behind.